The Giver Review

thegiverTitle: The Giver

Author: Lois Lowry

Genre: Children’s

Publication Date: 1993 by Harper Collins in Australia

Reminds me of: Just because it’s a dystopian novel I want to rattle off the usuals, but I just can’t! Maybe Uglies… I’m gonna go with Uglies here.

I think I’ll begin by arguing: is it dystopian or utopian? Dystopia we think The Hunger Games, Divergent, Delirium. There’s been an absolute boom in YA dystopian fiction but The Giver has been hanging around since long before.

A common theme with all dystopian novels is that they begin as a utopia (except The Hunger Games. I wasn’t tempted to live there at any point in time). The societies are built on the foundation that the founders have created the ideal and perfect state. In reality they’re masking a painful truth. The Giver isn’t like that. It’s a nice place to live, and the civilians accept society for what it is and not what they’re missing out on.

What is expected of Jonas is a huge burden for anyone to carry – let alone a twelve year old kid. In his mind he’s expected to carry the weight of the world. Everyone’s suffering and misery, every war and every loss. I don’t imagine any sane person being able to cope with that. With the bad, however, comes the good. The picturesque visions of sailing, of Christmas, of love – he’s blessed with the beauty too.

Ultimately, Jonas has the ability to defy every foundation his society has built. He has the freedom of choice. The newfound ability to let his consciousness speak and welcome the experience of decision making.

The concepts are written and discussed on a very basic level which is fine considering it’s a children’s book – Lowry has written extremely effectively for her target audience, I don’t know what more you can want of her. It’s filled with ambiguity but at the same time you learn appreciate everything for face value.

The lack of any emotion in this book emphasises the importance of pain (physical or emotional) and every other shitty feeling under the sun. Although Jonas’ society believes ignorance is bliss we, as the reader, have the capacity to judge their construction of harmony.  Without the bad we can’t appreciate the good for its full value. There is no good without bad – it’s as simple as that.

Rating:

★ ★ ★ ★ ☆

I really liked it! It was though provoking and I found myself daydreaming about its concepts while I was trying to study. As for my initial question – I’ll leave it up to you: dystopia or utopia guys?

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2 thoughts on “The Giver Review

  1. As a somewhat analytical reviewer myself, I loved the way you delved into the book and its messages here. And I agree with you about the author’s approach to writing the society. If I remember correctly, The Giver was the first dystopian novel I ever read, and I never had any trouble understanding the word – or that it was definitely a bad one to live in.

    As for your dystopia versus utopia question, I have a theory that the two are synonyms in a roundabout sort of way. A society can be either based on the person describing it. I would HATE living in a world where I couldn’t pick my own career or spouse and would call such a world a dystopia, but another person might love not having to make such decisions for herself and call it a utopia. That’s why dystopias/utopias are impossible to maintain.

    • I completely agree with your theory. You can’t have one without the other because it’s all about perception. And for the reader the society usually begins out as a “utopia” and once we experience the flaws then it becomes the “dystopia”. The society is still functioning as per norm, but it’s ideas about it that have changed.

      Have you read on or finished the other books in the series? 🙂

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